Reviews of BCS
BCS #127, #128 Reviewed at Locus Online
Posted in: Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

BCS #127 and #128 were reviewed last week by Locus online reviewer Lois Tilton.

She had insightful comments on all four stories. Of “The Crooked Mile” by Dan Rabarts, she said “though a simple fellow, Rosco makes some pretty wise judgments in a tough situation.”

David Tallerman’s “Ill-Met at Midnight” she called “A surprisingly interesting look at the workings of assassins’ guilds and their masters,” and of “The Clay Farima” by Henry Szabranski she said “Surprisingly, this ends up being a story of love.”

Congratulations, all!

Leave a Comment »
BCS #125, #126 Reviewed at Locus Online
Posted in: Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

BCS #125 and #126 were reviewed last week by Locus online reviewer Lois Tilton, including one story getting her rare “Recommended” rating.

Of “Else This, Nothing Ever Grows” by Sylvia Lindsteadt, she said “We recognize the story elements, but the characters are distinct, as are their narrative voices, each expressing their own points of view. And the story itself takes its own way, suitable for the new country, and not the way readers are likely to expect.”

Two Captains” by Gemma Files she called “A dark revenge fantasy with strong characters whose voices are vividly distinctive. RECOMMENDED.

Congratulations, all!

Leave a Comment »
BCS Reviewed at Black Gate Blog
Posted in: Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

Black GateReviewer Fletcher Vredenburgh at the blog of Black Gate magazine, long the bastion of swords & sorcery short fiction, features BCS in his recent review of the best new swords & sorcery of the last year.

He singles out a number of the more adventure-centric BCS stories from 2012, including “Sinking Among the Lilies” by Cory Skerry and “The Crimson Kestrel” by Leslianne Wilder.

He also mentions several others for their intensely dark mood, such as “The Ivy-Smothered Palisade” by Mike Allen.  He found it reminiscent of Clark Ashton Smith, that unsung colleague of Howard and Lovecraft who painted such evocative worlds of “lush decay,” in Vredenburgh’s words.

Thanks very much!

Leave a Comment »
Discussion / Analysis of “Boat in Shadows, Crossing” at Strange Horizons
Posted in: BCS Podcasts, For Writers, Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

The Short Fiction Snapshot column in Strange Horizons magazine (a fellow 2012 Hugo finalist for Best Semiprozine) this week takes an in-depth look at “Boat in Shadows, Crossing” by Tori Truslow, from BCS #113 and Podcast BCS 100: Boat in Shadows, Crossing.

Reviewer Abigail Nussbaum analyzes and discusses elements such as the genre reader being dumped into unfamiliar settings and societies, the way Truslow uses the different narratorial voices of the various sections of the story to comment on the gender situation and identity of the main character, how the language of the story is a key element in its world-building, and how all of these and the characters’ encounters work to build the theme that she felt in the story.

SH‘s Short Fiction Snapshot column routinely provides such thorough and well thought-out discussion, beyond the brief or casual comments in regular reviews. It’s well worth a read, especially for fans of “Boat in Shadows, Crossing”, and even for fans of literary fantasy in general.

Leave a Comment »
BCS Reviewed at Locus Online and Tangent
Posted in: Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

BCS #114 and #115 were reviewed at Locus online, including one of the four stories getting the rare “Recommended” rating, and BCS #114 was reviewed at Tangent.

Locus reviewer Lois Tilton said of “Sate My Thirst with Ink and Blood” by Adam Callaway that “The narrative voice, touched with dark humor and wit, is the making of this one. RECOMMENDED.”

Of the protagonist of “Beheaded by Peasants” by James L. Sutter, Tangent said her “dilemma and final solution bring fatalism and free will to a climactic clash that is certain to provoke an unforgettable reaction of the heart and mind.”  And “The Crimson Kestrel” by Leslianne Wilder was “peppered with plenty to keep the blood pumping. ...sit back and enjoy the ride.”

Congratulations, all!

Leave a Comment »
BCS #112, #113 Reviewed at Locus Online
Posted in: Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

BCS #112 and #113 were reviewed last week by Locus online reviewer Lois Tilton, including two of the four stories getting her rare “Recommended” rating.

Of “Death Sent” by Christian K. Martinez, she noted “A lot of imaginative scenes here in this short piece, neat images,” and she called “The Stone Oaks” by Stephen Case “An interesting and fairly original premise.”

Boat in Shadows, Crossing” by Tori Truslow was “a wondrous fantastic adventure full of magical stuff, stories nested in stories, ghosts and gods and demonic boats, and doomed loves. The narrative hops and skips and turns about, casting a story-spell that lures the reader through its twisty, root-trapped canals. RECOMMENDED.

And in “Misbegotten” by Raphael Ordoñez,  “Elerit gives the initial impression of a hapless character, but he proves to have deep resources and strong attachment. Another well-imagined setting increases reader enjoyment. RECOMMENDED.

Congratulations, all!

Leave a Comment »
Tangent Online 2012 Recommended Reading List
Posted in: Awards and Accolades, Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

A bunch of BCS stories made SF/F review site Tangent Online’s Recommended Reading List for 2012:

And at their two-star rating:

And at their three-star highest rating:

Congratulations, all!

Leave a Comment »
BCS #110, #111 Reviewed at Locus Online
Posted in: Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

BCS #110 and #111 were reviewed last weekend by Lois Tilton of Locus online.

She had particularly high praise for two of the stories, giving them both her rare Recommended rating:

“The Storms in Arisbat” by Therese Arkenberg she said has “a lot of detail here that enriches this story – elements of myth and history, the working of magic and its cost, philosophical meditation on death.”

Of “‘His Crowning Glory’: a new tale of the Antique Lands” by Noreen Doyle, she praised its “distinctive narrative voice... not the bland and anonymous omniscient narrator with which readers may be more familiar, but a voice with a strong personality of its own. The tone is light and salted with nice little nuggets of wit.” She also was impressed with “the richness of the world, a thronged, bustling, noisy bazaar of a setting.”

Congratulations! Especially for the praise on the vividness of the worlds, since that’s what we love at BCS–rich worlds that enhance the entire story.

Leave a Comment »
Locus Online Year-End Praise for BCS
Posted in: About BCS, Awards and Accolades, Reviews of BCS by Scott H. Andrews

Locus online’s indefatigable short fiction reviewer Lois Tilton recently posted her year-end review of the short fiction magazines she regularly reviews.

Last October on our fourth anniversary, she called BCS “a premier venue for fantastic fiction, not just online but for all media.”

This time, she included BCS along with Clarkesworld and Subterranean in saying “count three ezines as really outstanding,” singling out BCS stories by Emily Gilman, Richard Parks, Anne Ivy, Justin Howe, Karalynn Lee, Mark Teppo, and Noreen Doyle.

In addition, she had very high praise for BCS and our particular brand of fantasy:

...what BCS has done in the few years since its founding is to revive adventure fantasy, secondary-world fantasy, as a respectable subgenre of short fiction, raising it from the midden of disdain into which it had been cast by most of the rest of the field. Not a trivial accomplishment.

Thank you!  Creating a dedicated home for secondary-world fantasy was our aim from the very first issue.

We are very proud that we’ve achieved that, and we’re delighted for our efforts to get such recognition from someone so well-versed in the field.  Especially using such a great historical fantasy term as ‘midden.’ :)

1 Comment »
text